Chaucer irony and humour

If is because of his peculiar way of looking at things, as the bent of his mind is essentially humorous.

Humor, Irony and Satire in the Prologue of The Canterbury Tales

A social corrective, e. His humour does not simply raise a simile but also relieve us from seriousness and gloom. His humor is not tinged with fierce and biting satire. His aim is primarily to entertain his readers.

He is fond of hunting; he keeps a large number of fine horses in his stable; he finds the rules of monastic discipline to be old and therefore out of date; he does not wish to drive himself made by studying too much; and so on.

When he rides, the jingling of the bells on the bridle of his horse is heard at a distance; he finds the rules of monastic discipline to be old and therefore out of date; he does not wish to drive himself mad by studying too much and so on.

Comment on Chaucer's use of irony in the Prologue to the Canterbury Tales?

A Monk there was, one of the finest sort Who rode the country; hunting was his sport, A manly man, to be an Abbott able; many a dainty horse he had in his stable. Ironical humor occurs in the portrait of the Merchant when Chaucer tells us that the Merchant is so dignified in his dealing and his bargaining that no one could judge that the Merchant was in debt.

Chaucer ridiculed folly and hypocrisy but he was never fierce or bitter in his attitude. His humour is thoroughly delightful, being free from the taint of ill-will, cynicism, and pessimism. The largest target of this satire is the Clergy because it is rife with hypocrisy. Therefore, he is an objective humourist, a better realist than an indignant satirist.

Besides the Pardoner, who has previously been mentioned, the Prioress is another member of the estate of the Clergy whom Chaucer satirizes in his own inimitable way.

Humour, Satire and Irony in the Prologue

I saw his sleeves were garnished at the hand With fine gray fur, the finest in the land, And on his hood, to fasten it at his chin He had a wrought-gold cunningly fashioned pin: The largest target of this satire is the Clergy because it is rife with hypocrisy.

During his lifetime, England was a Catholic country, so it was under a certain degree of influence from the Pope. However, he exposes the vices of the society in a subtle and gentle manner.

Humor, Irony and Satire in the Prologue of The Canterbury Tales

Guided by his sense of humour, Chaucer observes everything and records each detail with smiling eyes, slightly emphasizing one aspect here or another there, in order to evoke in the reader that psychological state which makes him laugh without any malice.

The Pardoner was a cheat and a hypocrite. His humour is not of satirical kind. The Monk, too, is also pilgrim whom Chaucer satirizes. The motive behind this kind of humor is laughter for its own sake.

It is said that Chaucer's humor is gentle because he has a deep affection for humanity. He mingles the comic with the tragic. Smiles and tears find here equal. But it is worth thinking about the differences between these two fictional narrators: A friar's job to is to serve the poor as a representative of the Church.

But it is worth thinking about the differences between these two fictional narrators: Not only has he ignored his vows of poverty with his dogs and fine horse and his clothes trimmed in fur, and humility as he possesses eyes that Chaucer describes ironically, writing that they "glittered like flame.

In the Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer creates what is known as estate satire. Satire is found in the world of Chaucer, but it is rarely coarse, seldom severe, and never savage.

In satire, there is the use of irony, humor, and exaggeration to criticize the foibles and vices of people.

Chaucer was a man of catholic (tolerant) spirit, so his natural bent of mind was towards humour, not towards satire. If humour is genial and sympathetic, satire is pungent and bitter.

Chaucer's satire is mainly directed against religious corruption. Humour, Irony and Satire in Literature 69 A writer may point a satire toward a person, a country or even the entire world.

Usually, a satire is a comical piece of writing which makes fun of an individual or a society to expose its stupidity and shortcomings.

Humour in the Prologue appears chiefly in the shape of irony and satire, though we do have some examples of pure humour which means fun and laughter for their own sake.

Chaucer is perpetually showing the humorous side, not merely of his emotions but his interests, his knowledge, his beliefs, his everything. Chaucer Irony And Humour.

Canterbury Tales Essay Geoffery Chaucer, a man known as a “Father of English Literature” wrote The Canterbury Tales, which contributed to the development of English Literature. Chaucer has influenced many people through his writtings.

Geoffery Chaucer was born in London, England in Chaucer began. Chaucer was a man of catholic (tolerant) spirit, so his natural bent of mind was towards humour, not towards satire. If humour is genial and sympathetic, satire is pungent and bitter.

Chaucer's satire is mainly directed against religious corruption.

Chaucer's use of humour

In satire, there is the use of irony, humor, and exaggeration to criticize the foibles and vices of people. Chaucer cleverly satirizes many of the pilgrims as he points to their hypocrisy.

Chaucer irony and humour
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24 Study: Chaucer’s humour and irony