The direct and indirect characterization of curleys wife in of mice and men a novel by john steinbec

The workers, George included, see her as having "the eye" for every guy on the ranch, and they cite this as the reason for Curley's insecurity and hot-headed temperament.

Humble and weary, Candy seems to be at the end of his line after Carlson shoots his last possession and companion, his old, blind dog.

Another way to prove himself is by marrying a physically attractive woman.

Of Mice and Men

When the author flat out describes a charater. The character were never going to succeed. Wise and observant, Crooks listens to Lennie's talk of the dream of the farm with cynicism.

She is portrayed, like the girl in Weed, as a liar and manipulator of men. He is mentally disabled but no-one knows why. Read an in-depth analysis of Candy. Her beauty is such that perhaps that dream might have come true. The boxer, the son of the boss, the angry and hot-headed obstacle to George's attempt to keep Lennie out of trouble at Soledad.

Nevertheless, a dream is a dream, different for everyone, and George and Lennie share the similar attribute of desiring what they haven't got. Curley is bothered by his height, so he chooses to pick battles with any taller person he meets. Lennie needs looking after. Although Whit may not give a true picture of Curley's wife's character, he does give a good impression of the way she behaves.

His understanding of George's dream is more childish and he grows excited at the possibility of tending the future rabbits, most likely because it will afford him a chance to pet their soft hides as much as he wishes.

He knows that Lennie might pick up dead things like the mouse, and he has to protect him from it.

Of Mice and Men

George tells Lennie to look the other way. Indirect characterization in the merchant of Venice. Nearly every scene in which Lennie appears confirms these and only these characteristics. This, in turn, causes George to make the decision to kill Lennie mercifully.

George's companion, the source of the novel's conflict. The old, one-handed swamper who is the first to befriend George and Lennie at Soledad. His innocence raises him to a standard of pure goodness that is more poetic and literary than realistic. Characterization: Curley's Wife in Of Mice And Men With colorful statements like "She had full, rouged lips and wide-spaced eyes, heavily made up.

The Direct and Indirect Characterization of Curley's Wife in Of Mice and Men, a Novel by John Steinbeck PAGES 2.

What is indirect characterization?

WORDS View Full Essay. A good example of indirect characterization for Curley's wife is found in the conversation between George and a minor character called Whit. George dealt and Whit picked up his cards and examined.

Curley's wife has a lot of names, but we can't repeat any of them in mixed company. Let's just call her trouble: she's a good-looking woman who knows it, wearing makeup, form-fitting dresses, and ostrich-feathered high heels. An author can use either direct or indirect characterization to describe a character.

When an author uses direct characterization, he is telling you about the characters. When he uses indirect characterization, you learn about the characters indirectly, through what they say and do and what other characters say about them.

Curley, the boss' son, is an evil character in Steinbeck's world. Even Lennie feels the sense of menace when Curley first comes into the bunkhouse. Curley is a "thin young man with a brown face, with brown eyes and a head of tightly curled hair.".

Jump to John Steinbeck and see how teachers think you should prepare in: GCSE AS and A-level 93 International Baccalaureate 1, University 15 Read more Save Submit similar essay Essay preview GCSE JOHN STEINBECK Task Of Mice and Men: In a omgmachines2018.com Steinbeck Wrote of Curley wife: She is a nice girl and not a floozy.

The direct and indirect characterization of curleys wife in of mice and men a novel by john steinbec
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What is direct characterization in Of Mice and Men? | eNotes